Games as Spectator Sport

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Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Plasman » Wed Mar 11, 2009 5:47 pm

Okay, folks, I'm gonna throw something out here. :idea:

Who amongst you video-game fans have ever come across a game that you think would be better to watch than to play? Or, have you ever had an occasion where you've spent more time on the sidelines instead of in the driver's seat, even though someone's offered you the controller? (As opposed to sitting and waiting for some selfish jerk to finish their turn... :evil: )

Put simply: Do you think video games can double as a viewing as well as a playing experience?
Are there any examples of games you'd think would work on a big screen, played by a professional gamer?
(or at least someone who knows which way to point the Wiimote)

The only reason I ask is because I've been playing a lot of Zelda: Twilight Princess lately, and whenever I defeat one of the bosses, I half expect to hear a round of applause from an unseen audience... :blush:
If this last post seems ridiculous, please disregard it. Thank you. ;)
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By the way I made two level packs for Boppin' in case anyone is interested... :oops:
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby strange_person » Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:17 pm

Resident Evil 4, if the button cues were removed.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Zazozaliad » Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:36 pm

I'm not exactly the most spectacular example of interesting, but I enjoy watching people play video games. 3D ones probably more so, since if I even glimpse something with sprites I rush off to play it and get antsy watching someone else do it.

Might be because when I was little I right sucked at every game that wasn't turn based and had trouble with ones that were, but I just got more enjoyment watching my granpa play, say, Jak & Daxter, than trying to do it myself. It was still fun, and I still got engaged in the story (probably more than gramps) and I was able to pick out some stuff he would've missed otherwise. We never did get that last Power Cell, though...
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Relee » Thu Mar 12, 2009 7:58 am

I watch Let's Play and I Played A Thing playthroughs sometimes. Mostly shorter games, but I watched the entire Ys Book 1 & 2 playthrough that a friend of a friend of mine did.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Ashes » Thu Mar 12, 2009 9:56 am

No, I don't appreciate video-games-as-spectator-sport. Especially not long single-player games. I consider it rude to invite someone over to your house just to watch you play the latest Final Fantasy game.

Inviting you over to help you play it is another thing entirely. Looking up stats, discussing strategies, helping to figure out where to go next, taking turns at the controller, etc.. That can be fun. When the game itself embraces cooperative play, it's even better.

Fighting games and scrolling shooters, games which were birthed in the arcades, are an exception to the rule. Watching these is almost like watching a sport, and a single round of play is short enough that you don't get bored waiting for your chance to jump in.

My grandma used to like watching me play videogames. Especially long singe-player games.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby marinschild » Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:36 pm

Ashes wrote:I consider it rude to invite someone over to your house just to watch you play the latest Final Fantasy game.

This reminds me of something that happened to my best friend. Five years ago, my best friend was invited to spend the night at his friend's (Justin's) house. When he got there, the first thing Justin did was invite him upstairs to watch a video tape. What was on this tape? Oh nothing but the recording of the final boss fight from Final Fantasy 7 played by Justin himself. The segment lasted for ten minutes, and when it was over Justin wanted to watch it again.

Who watches role playing game battles in multiple viewings? The answer is simple: A Juste.

Do I think games can be a spectator sport? Certainly. The reason that cyber-athletics is doing as well as it does is due to the fact that some people enjoy watching professionals play video games. How else will you see someone go on a 25 point killing spree or someone pull a 72 hit combo in their favorite fighting game? But there comes a time in a spectators experience, as it is with all spectator sports, that sometimes you get tired of watching and want to play the game and experience it first hand.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Wizard CaT » Thu Mar 12, 2009 9:59 pm

Ashes wrote:No, I don't appreciate video-games-as-spectator-sport. Especially not long single-player games. I consider it rude to invite someone over to your house just to watch you play the latest Final Fantasy game.


That basically is like inviting someone over to watch a movie though.

COUGH!

Well, I don't really watch people game, even back in the day, but my friends would come over my house and we'd play things like DoTT and Sam&Max or Space Quest together. I'd have the mouse, but those games were more about the comedy and puzzle solving.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Monthenor » Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

I've watched things like the 30-hour Let's Play of Sonic the Hedgehog 2006, but that had great narration. More often it was Morgion sitting around with his laptop while I played games like Shadow of the Colossus or Dark Cloud 2.
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Re: Games as Spectator Sport

Postby Plasman » Mon Mar 16, 2009 4:20 am

Ashes wrote:No, I don't appreciate video-games-as-spectator-sport. Especially not long single-player games. I consider it rude to invite someone over to your house just to watch you play the latest Final Fantasy game.

I'm guessing you're speaking from experience, then. ;]
THAT is sucky. That's just an example of bad hosting, though. Friendship fail?

It seems to me that a lot of the more recent games (ie. the ones running on the last two generations of console) incorporate a more interesting storyline. That is, they actually include the plot within the game itself, instead of just two paragraphs in the instruction booklet. It also helps to have a few extra dozen polygons to render some jaw-dropping environments, as opposed to a bunch of blocky pixels simulating a "spooky castle".
Then again, there would be more than a few vintage titles that could engage an audience. I remember when I went to the Game On exhibition last year, the very first thing you saw was a large wall projection of someone playing Frogger (or it could have been Donkey Kong - it was one of those multi-game console things). There were easily a dozen spectators commenting on the game, discussing how it was played (and who could play it better).

I think the watchability of a game greatly depends on who is playing it. Watching someone wander about the same three or four locations building up their stats, or because they're just lost, is fricking boring. But when you see them actually make some real progress, and get some kick-ass cinema out of it, is awesome.

I also agree that you can still interact from the sidelines, something you can't do with a regular movie. In fact some of the great single-player games work equally well with a team. Back in high school, there were a bunch of us computer geeks trying to solve all the levels in Lemmings and it's sequel - one person would play the game, and the rest of us would some up with suggestions for attacking the puzzles. Once the level was finished, we'd share the password and carry on until it was time to go to class. Those were fun days... :mrgreen:
If this last post seems ridiculous, please disregard it. Thank you. ;)
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By the way I made two level packs for Boppin' in case anyone is interested... :oops:
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