A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby Relee » Tue Nov 24, 2009 6:50 am

I saw this link on Reddit. It's really quite amazing. It's a health care clinic with two doors that are secretly connected to the same medical office. One is for poor people and one is for rich people, but the same doctors see either one and the same equipment is used on them.

Well I say poor people and rich people, but it's actually middle class and rich people, isn't it? Poor people don't get health care in the states. ^.^;;

Anyways check it out here.
-- Relee the Squirrel --
User avatar
Relee
Watermelon Graduate

  Offline
 
Posts: 904
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 2:25 am
Location: Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, North America, Earth, Sol, Milky Way, Universe 2

Re: A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby Ashes » Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:31 am

Very poor people can get some healthcare in the US, but not much, through Medicaid. I know a couple people who use it. It's not a very good system, but it's something.

It's seems to be the people who have low-paying jobs who have the most trouble getting health care. They're not poor enough for Medicaid to kick in. Their jobs suck too much to include a health plan. They don't make enough money to pay for health insurance on their own.

Unemployed people here sometimes have to turn down job offers because it would disqualify them for Medicaid, but wouldn't pay enough to cover their medical bills.
User avatar
Ashes
Melon Class

  Offline
 
Posts: 565
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:09 am

Re: A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby Coda » Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:47 am

You know, as unpleasant as that article makes it sound, I for one see no problem with offering extra services for extra money. That it happens to be related to health care strikes a negative chord with many people's heartstrings but I see no rational reason why it should be considered improper. Forcing anything else would risk raising prices or lowering quality for everyone, which would be reflected in rising insurance premiums across the board and, possibly, as a cost-saving measure, reduced coverage for preventative care.
User avatar
Coda
Magickal Melon 666

  Offline
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 12:19 pm
Location: Holy crap, Coda set an avatar

Re: A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby draque » Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:09 am

I'm on board with Coda here. Providing basic healthcare to everyone is one thing, but demanding that all healthcare across the be identical? Money may be exchanged for goods and services. Medical care is a service. People with more money will be able to obtain more medical care as a result. Unless you do away with the whole system, you're going to be left with that, and I don't honestly see the problem with it. I'm not supporting the idea that the poor be denied all medical coverage or something extreme like that, but preventing people from purchasing additional care seems absurd to me. The article mentions that the employees were told not to tell patients about the opposing doors, which strikes me as a bit skeezy, but ultimately, the one door leads to a room where you must pay with credit or cash. That is worth more than people who are using insurance on the spot, given that there's the potential that both the insurance will decline coverage and that the person won't have the money to pay. You can't go and repossess medical care given, so the cost has to ultimately be eaten.

Edited: last three sentences added after reading article more carefully.
Last edited by draque on Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:23 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
draque
Watermelon Graduate

  Offline
 
Posts: 907
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 11:57 am
Location: <=CLEVER-LOCATION=>

Re: A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby strange_person » Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:20 am

It wouldn't be an issue if the patients could choose. I've got no problem with gratuitously-rich people throwing money around to make themselves more comfortable...ultimately, that's what money is for. The problem is drum brakes.

Pretty much every car you see on the road now has disc brakes, right? More expensive to produce, but there's the advantage that they'll actually work even when the road is wet or they're a bit overheated. In fact, it's actually illegal to make a car with drum brakes anymore, because the feds figured out that disc brakes save lives and the technology had developed enough that the car companies couldn't credibly whine about it being economically infeasible.

As it stands, the two clinic-faces have to stay separate because to do otherwise would be considered fraud. Why? They've got the same basic menu of service. If, when making the appointment, there was the equivalent of an offer to super-size, "For an extra $200 cash-up-front you can get a shorter wait, fuzzy robe, talk with the doctor that same day, and more dignified treatment overall," that certainly wouldn't be fraud, or malpractice, or anything like that. Just a matter of supply and demand, and keeping the market efficient by allowing more complete access to information.

It's only a bribe if you keep it secret from whoever's not paying.
Hello!

Praise be to Athè, and Hob, Her living vessel.
2<3
For I have crescent pies to bake
And smiles to throw before I wake
User avatar
strange_person
2000 Post Medal Of Wow!

  Offline
 
Posts: 2274
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:09 pm

Re: A Living Example of Two Tiered Healthcare

Postby Ashes » Tue Nov 24, 2009 11:55 am

Relee, when you pointed this out, you didn't really give your own opinion on it. So what do you think? And how does the service provided through each door compare to what you get when you go to your doctor in Canada?

I think having a rich-people door and an plebeian-door feels vaguely wrong, but that condemning the practice based on vague feelings is also wrong. Specific feelings, at the very least, should be had before condemning anything.

The fact that patients coming in through the pleb-door don't get to talk to their doctor at all is bad for very specific reasons. But that isn't really connected to the fact that this place has two tiers of service. Lack of patient-doctor contact is a plague in this country. It happens regardless of how many doors your doctor's office has.
User avatar
Ashes
Melon Class

  Offline
 
Posts: 565
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:09 am


Return to The Political Arena

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron