Fun With Linovection


Kaye Haychold's ambitious plan

Fun With Linovection

Postby Jennifer Diane Reitz » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:26 am

Because of my dimwitted response to a question about how much weight Mr. Pho could carry in strip 315, I thought it might be worthwhile to redeem myself with a casual talk about the nature of linovection in the Tryslmaistan cosmos.

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In our universe, Mundis, gravity is an all-pervasive force which causes matter to be attracted to other matter, pulling towards the center of a given mass.

One way that has been used to describe gravity is that it is the displacement caused by the energy density of mass affecting higher dimensional space, curving spacetime around mass within our universe. While this is an inadequate description, especially in light of modern examinations of the subject, including but not limited to M-Theory, quantum gravity, and so on, it is useful here because it acts as a nice stepping stone to explaining how linovection works in Tryslmaistan.

In the Tryslmaistan cosmos, linovection takes the place of gravity. Linovection differs from gravity in many fundamental ways, not the least of which is that it does not pull matter towards mass, but rather acts as a universal monodirectional kinetic field: the entire universe has a cosmic 'down' and a cosmic, universal 'up'. This polarization of the entire universe is linovection.

To understand linovection, imagine that the spacetime of Tryslmaistan is a great block of plastic, and that this plastic has been stretched so that stress lines have appeared throughout it, stretch marks that all run parallel to each other, from top to bottom. If we imagine the gravity of Mundis as spacetime being distorted, curved, around mass, the vast rubber sheet of Mundis spacetime dimpled with pits sunken by weights put upon it (a common analogy) then we can imagine linovection as the polarization -like polarized sunglasses- of the plastic block of Tryslmaistan spacetime.

Linovection, like many laws within our own universe, such as the Strong and Weak nuclear forces, operates within limitations of scale; linovection is powerful at small scales, but very weak at large scales. The result is that vast and massive cohesive objects are nearly unaffected by linovection, one reason why triangular Worldplates hang in the sky, affected instead by other forces which take over at that scale. People and buildings are greatly affected, and experience a downward force nearly equivalent to the 1G field we know on earth, but as the scale of objects shrink to 1mm and below, linovection again fades to nearly nothing again. Linovective force affects matter, therefore, within a range bounded by the very small and the very large.

To understand how linovection interacts with matter and mass, imagine that space is filled with invisible lines of force, running from 'up' to 'down'. These etherial lines pass through all things, air and land and objects and yourself, and they are what confer the feeling of weight to all things.

The apparent weight of any object in Tryslmaistan is created by two main factors; the quantity of linea -those invisible lines of linovective force- that pass through the geometry of an object, and the number of planes that intercept these linea -interacting with them- within the tratons (the Tryslmaistan equivalent of atoms) that make up the matter that a given object is made out of. Different elemental tratons have different numbers of geometric planes of force, and this determines part of their effective 'weight' within a linovective field, as well as their effective mass.

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You might think, then, that if 'weight' in Tryslmaistan is caused by the number of linea passing through the geometry of an object, that the orientation of an object matters, and would change apparent weight. This would be correct. In Tryslmaistan, the taller and thinner an object is, the less of a cross-section is exposed to the linea, and the lighter it is, to a point. The wider and flatter an object is, the heavier it becomes, because its cross-section is exposed to more linea, more lines of linovective force.

This strange quirk means that if you lived in Tryslmaistan, you would feel heavier lying down than standing up, a plate in your hand would feel heavier flat than on edge, and a vertical pile of boxes would weigh less, in general, than boxes laid out flat on a pallet.

Now this is not the whole story; apparent weight is also affected by the material that something is made out of, which is to say the chemical elements that make it up, and thus the tratonic planes of those elements, but in general, overall, this basic rule of linovection -that the universe has a polarized force that is affected by cross-section- holds in all cases.

Now this means that in Tryslmaistan, some strange things happen that might surprise a visitor from our universe; a balloon would fall like a rock, and a droplet of water would take ages to fall to the ground, and so it is that rain falls very slowly there, and balloons are no different than balls or spheres of wood, and none can be made to float. Ballooning is impossible in Tryslmaistan. In theory, if a dense enough gas of the right elements were made, and a light enough balloon and gas within that balloon places within a tank of that gas, under the right laboratory conditions the balloon might be made to float... but this would be an extraordinary thing, at the fringes of physical science, not something for everyday use. In any normal situation, linovection would tend to trump atmospheric buoyancy.

The closest thing would be, of course, a boat, which can still float in Tryslmaistan, supported by the cohesion and density of water; this still works there, though not properly a balloon.

The fact that tall is light and squat is heavy has a direct bearing on everything from life to engineering; this is the reason that Jellese buildings are all tall tower-like shapes, or strong domes, these are the shapes best suited for Tryslmaistan construction. Humans, for a while, fought this and tried to make earth-like buildings, but in the end they followed the local physical laws, and we see this in any high-tech time or splay, with tall, tower-like buildings dominating the cityscape.

Even in simpler times and places within Tryslmaistan, only smaller structures, such as houses, or few-story buildings, are built in earthly manner, any tall buildings are inevitably thinner than they are wide. This rule is so powerful, in fact, that in the very far future of Tryslmaistan, towers can be built to truly incredible heights, kilometers in fact, very easily. This is why we see distant Worldplates with thin towers upon them that reach far above the extent of the land; this is not an artifact of my illustration, this is a correct representation of the monumental scale of Humanojellese (and beyond) architecture! There are buildings, in that future time, that extend upwards to a length greater than the width of the Worldplate upon which they stand. One can only imagine the view!

From time to time, a silly stunt that has been done is to have people stand atop each other's shoulders, as we might see in a circus act on earth, but taken to ridiculous extremes. It is not unlikely to have dozens or more people thus stacked, a fearful height, none of them suffering overly unduly under the load (though to be sure the bottom-most participants do suffer and must be strong) compared to the impossibility of such a feat here on earth under the laws of Mundis.

Naturally enough, this stunt is not without risk; falling is very much an issue, as is the fact that weight will eventually overcome even the strongest at the bottom, leading to a truly terrible tragedy if the situation becomes impossible. But humans being human regardless of the cosmos which they inhabit, this kind of tomfoolery is only to be expected, really.

And this brings us, finally, back to the issue of whether or not Mr. Pho could haul Kaye's body, with the metal H-Hold inside of it, as well as the two electanic packs, all by himself. And the answer is yes, but that he must also be strong, because while the correct method of carrying can do much to obviate any issue of weight, the fact also is that metal weighs more -even in linovection- than does flesh, or fabric, and that machinery is heavy in either universe, ours or theirs.

Pho can lift more, if correctly angled, in Tryslmaistan than an equivalent man could in Mundis, but to see him carry Kaye thus does suggest that his physical prowess is not inconsequential.

I hope you have enjoyed our little exploration of linovection.

(And I hope I have not screwed up in doing it!)
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Alikat » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:37 am

The aspect of inertia that makes an object in motion tend to remain in motion until acted upon by an outside force is likely to be naturally the same in all three universes, and might just be one physical aspect that all the local cluster of universes in that region of hyperspace share, along with strong three-space-one-time presentation.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Jennifer Diane Reitz » Fri Jan 09, 2009 7:33 am

Alikat wrote:The aspect of inertia that makes an object in motion tend to remain in motion until acted upon by an outside force is likely to be naturally the same in all three universes, and might just be one physical aspect that all the local cluster of universes in that region of hyperspace share, along with strong three-space-one-time presentation.


I concur. Inertia must be a common element to these universes. I suspect that physical law sets overlap in clusters which share some multiversal connection, commonality, or similarity on a grand scale. One very basic commonality in all of these universes, Mundis, Tryslmaistan, and the created stable arc-duct of Pastel, is that all have a functional equivalent to light, gravity, and the basic laws of motion and energy interaction as we understand them. All have the equivalent of planets and suns, after a fashion; all are vast voids sprinkled with matter lumps, rather than, say, an infinite expanse of matter sprinkled with voids or whatever.

It would be reasonable, I think that universes with common structure should have similar physics sets, or at least draw from the same pool of logical possibility.

It is also remarkably convenient in terms of being able to write stories that have human-like beings within them doing comprehensible things, isn't it? Talk about lucky!
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby strange_person » Fri Jan 09, 2009 7:39 am

They're also all folded around the edges.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby marinschild » Fri Jan 09, 2009 11:45 am

All this talk about Tryslmaistan physics makes me miss Dr. Alchemist, but I do love knowing how these things work in a foreign universe.

I've always had this question in the back of my mind. Does the fact that the Pastel equivalent to an atom being shaped like a tesseract imply that Pastel is an extra dimensional universe compared to Mundis?
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Skatche » Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:41 pm

marinschild wrote:All this talk about Tryslmaistan physics makes me miss Dr. Alchemist, but I do love knowing how these things work in a foreign universe.

I've always had this question in the back of my mind. Does the fact that the Pastel equivalent to an atom being shaped like a tesseract imply that Pastel is an extra dimensional universe compared to Mundis?


Not at all. Four dimensions is peanuts compared to ten or more. (Then again, some physicists are suggesting that, information theoretically, space is actually two-dimensional, and spacetime 3D).
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby draque » Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:48 pm

Skatche wrote:
marinschild wrote:All this talk about Tryslmaistan physics makes me miss Dr. Alchemist, but I do love knowing how these things work in a foreign universe.

I've always had this question in the back of my mind. Does the fact that the Pastel equivalent to an atom being shaped like a tesseract imply that Pastel is an extra dimensional universe compared to Mundis?


Not at all. Four dimensions is peanuts compared to ten or more. (Then again, some physicists are suggesting that, information theoretically, space is actually two-dimensional, and spacetime 3D).


In terms of information theory, you can represent any number of higher dimensions with a single dimension. If you had a single dimensional universe infinitely long in both directions which had enough particles in it interacting with the particles directly adjacent to one another, you could set it up in such a way that the interactions accurately represented an X dimensional reality. A Turing machine running a simulation of a universe would be an example of something very similar to this.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Skatche » Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:35 am

draque wrote:In terms of information theory, you can represent any number of higher dimensions with a single dimension. If you had a single dimensional universe infinitely long in both directions which had enough particles in it interacting with the particles directly adjacent to one another, you could set it up in such a way that the interactions accurately represented an X dimensional reality. A Turing machine running a simulation of a universe would be an example of something very similar to this.


That's computational complexity theory more than information theory. Plus, we don't actually know that the universe has the same computational capabilities as a Turing machine (though it seems very likely that it's at least as strong as one). The phenomenon I'm referring to is that the maximum amount of information that can be contained in a portion of space is proportional to the surface area of that space, not the volume. (Though don't ask me for the technical details because I don't know 'em.)
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby NMcCoy » Sun Jan 25, 2009 11:39 pm

I'm still having some trouble making a mental model of linovective force that's internally consistent. For the physics to work as described, there must necessarily be some "linovective shadowing", right? Otherwise the orientation of an object wouldn't matter - if you stand something up vertically, each horizontal infinitesimal cross-section of the object would be intersected by fewer linea, but there's more such cross sections, and if there's no shadowing effect then some basic calculus will tell you that you get the same amount of force.

Amusingly, some perpetual motion machines that don't work in Mundis will work in Trys without any modification whatsoever to their design.

I forget, is there no wind in Trys because the sun provides no radiant heat, or because there's no convection? If there's no convection, does fire burn cooler and more slowly, as it does in Mundis microgravity? Can the water at the bottom of your teapot boil while the top remains cold?
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Alikat » Mon Jan 26, 2009 1:58 am

The linovection stria are akin to our cosmic strings, each stria is a closed finite loop of strained MEST that happens (In Trys) to be perfectly straight. So there doesn't have to be a shadowing effect, since it's the number of stria intersected by the object that counts, not the volume of cross-sections of the object that are being intersected. Think of it as abacus beads, with some beads larger that have more wires running through them. It's the number of wires in a bead that counts, not the combined length of the drill holes.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Jennifer Diane Reitz » Mon Jan 26, 2009 9:13 am

Alikat wrote:The linovection stria are akin to our cosmic strings, each stria is a closed finite loop of strained MEST that happens (In Trys) to be perfectly straight. So there doesn't have to be a shadowing effect, since it's the number of stria intersected by the object that counts, not the volume of cross-sections of the object that are being intersected. Think of it as abacus beads, with some beads larger that have more wires running through them. It's the number of wires in a bead that counts, not the combined length of the drill holes.


Alikat is an expert on these matters, there is nothing I can add.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby strange_person » Mon Jan 26, 2009 9:21 am

How is an "object" determined?
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Jennifer Diane Reitz » Mon Jan 26, 2009 11:28 am

strange_person wrote:How is an "object" determined?


A discrete object in Tryslmaistan is defined as being a conglomeration of tratons bound together by yauronic forces sustained by the ambient electanic field.

There is always some field, even in an electanic dead zone, such as at the abandoned, shadowed museum. If there were a total absence of the electanic field (only possible under controlled laboratory conditions) then matter itself would fall apart, the rough Tryslmaistan equivalent of dropping into a Bose–Einstein condensate, sort-of. Tratons devoid of the electanic field have their geometric planes become unbound, and collapse into a seething, effectively 2D sludge of abstract energy angles.

This nature to discreet objects is part of what permits them to anentropically 'heal' over time (restore 'lost' information); a lump of matter gradually acquires a kind of electanic 'geist', equivalent in a fairly distant way to entanglement within Mundis, which acts as a kind of 'information reservoir' of sorts. When an object, such as a cup, is broken, the electanic 'memory', entanglement, is the blueprint from which the cup is restored.

The electanic geist of matter is never utterly lost, but it can become supplanted in dominance by newer geists along the timeline, which means that every cup contains within it a dim memory of the original matter from which it was created, and echos from even further back, but the cup form, the most recent, becomes more dominant the longer the cup remains in a stable configuration.

In effect, all matter is 'memory metal' in Tryslmaistan. Sort of.

There is a cool experiment done in far-future science classes within Tryslmaistan, where a very ancient object is instantly and smoothly pulverized to the tratonic level within a highly-charged chamber filled with a pure gas, and as the dust swirls within the chamber, the outline of the object can still be seen, a literal electanic ghost. It needs to be properly illuminated, of course, but the effect is amazing. At least to first-year students.

The effect is caused by the particles of matter interacting with each other when they pass near each other, purely by chance, through the location they originally were stable within as part of the original object. For a brief instant, they tarry, attracted by mutual 'memory', and this pause results in a slight density within the dust cloud outlining the original, discrete object.

Given enough time, isolated and stable, such a chamber would permit the original artifact to reform. It would take a very long time, of course, but it would happen, provided nothing disturbed the reformation.

This is also, of course, the basis by which the entire cosmos can reform after Stormfall is over, in those splays with Stormfall.

And excess electanic charge stored within a very large, extremely stable discrete object (such as a Worldplate), excess 'geist' if you will, can discharge like a capacitor, and this is the source of Shatterel as we have previously learned.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Skatche » Mon Jan 26, 2009 11:42 am

strange_person wrote:How is an "object" determined?


This is my usual beef with the whole linovection idea: say you've got two halves of a sphere, held so their flat edges are vertical and facing each other. They each have a certain rate of falling, say v. If you touch them together, we would assume that they're still counted as separate objects, and still fall at rate v. But suppose you allow a single tratonic bond between them? Would they fall at rate v or 2v? If it would still be v, how many tratonic bonds would it take for the two objects to become one, as far as linovection is concerned?

If we assume that a single tratonic bond is all it takes, then we would have to assume some kind of unified tratolinic field theory. My suspicion is that this has to do with the fact that tratons are collections of planes of (electanic?) force, and that the intersection of linovective striations with these planes would produce linovection - but that the force-planes inside an object would somehow interact to produce a countervailing antilinovective force, similarly to how (in our universe) the electric charge in a volume of space can be determined by integrating the electric flux across the surface of that volume.

I expect it would involve tensor calculus and other such monstrosities.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby NMcCoy » Mon Jan 26, 2009 11:19 pm

Skatche has pretty much expressed my own issues with the science of it. It comes back to the analogue of Galileo's beef with the physics of his time- if heavier "objects" fall faster than lighter "objects", does a brick fall faster than two half-bricks? What if you tie the two half-bricks with a piece of string? How long can the string be? For Trys, substitute the relevant definition of "heavier" and "string".

Do desks routinely get crushed under the weight of a stack of paper? Can this be remedied by binding the papers into a book?

Suppose I have a block of cheese, sitting on a kitchen scale. I then use my ninja skills to make a horizontal slice through the cheese with my katana, leaving the top half atop the bottom half. The scale now reads double what it did before, correct?

What happens when I shred the cheese?

Suppose I have a ream of a thousand sheets of paper. This poses no real hazard as long as I keep it vertical, but if I happen to knock it over it starts crashing its way through the worldplate?
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They...collect colored orbs to influence the development of their somewhat-detachable attack pod?
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Skatche » Mon Jan 26, 2009 11:31 pm

NMcCoy wrote:Skatche has pretty much expressed my own issues with the science of it. It comes back to the analogue of Galileo's beef with the physics of his time- if heavier "objects" fall faster than lighter "objects", does a brick fall faster than two half-bricks? What if you tie the two half-bricks with a piece of string? How long can the string be? For Trys, substitute the relevant definition of "heavier" and "string".

Do desks routinely get crushed under the weight of a stack of paper? Can this be remedied by binding the papers into a book?

Suppose I have a block of cheese, sitting on a kitchen scale. I then use my ninja skills to make a horizontal slice through the cheese with my katana, leaving the top half atop the bottom half. The scale now reads double what it did before, correct?

What happens when I shred the cheese?

Suppose I have a ream of a thousand sheets of paper. This poses no real hazard as long as I keep it vertical, but if I happen to knock it over it starts crashing its way through the worldplate?


Your thought experiments are a lot cooler than mine.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Jennifer Diane Reitz » Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:12 am

NMcCoy wrote:Skatche has pretty much expressed my own issues with the science of it. It comes back to the analogue of Galileo's beef with the physics of his time- if heavier "objects" fall faster than lighter "objects", does a brick fall faster than two half-bricks? What if you tie the two half-bricks with a piece of string? How long can the string be? For Trys, substitute the relevant definition of "heavier" and "string".


Try not being so digital. Tryslmaistan is an analog universe, a natural universe. This is not a matter of some yes/no, 1/0 digital thing.

First: the apparent weight of an object is greatly dependent upon its horizontal cross-section, so a brick falls faster if it is oriented one way than another. The same is true of a dish, or any flat object. The reason is the number of linea passing through the tratons that make up a discrete object (the definition of which has already been deeply explained).

If you tie two half-bricks with a piece of string, nothing particularly changes. Each half brick falls as a half brick normally would, and the string connecting them matters not at all. The issue is not whether anything is connected to anything else per se, the issue is how many vertical lines, linea, pass through the cross-section of a lump of matter.

Do desks routinely get crushed under the weight of a stack of paper? Can this be remedied by binding the papers into a book?


No. Not usually. Weight is determined, as mentioned, by the number of vertical linea passing through matter, the density of a particular form of matter also is a factor too. Denser matter is made of elements with more complex tratons (I've explained this all before!) that have more geometric planes, these planes 'catch' or are affected by the linea, and the result is one factor in weight.

In Tryslmaistan, as I have mentioned numerous times, permits very, very tall things that cannot exist under gravity, because a small horizontal cross-section means less weight than a large horizontal cross-section. A tower is less problematic than a long flat rambling building.

Binding would be irrelevant; the issue, once again, is horizontal cross-section (and a bit of tratonic density too.)

Suppose I have a block of cheese, sitting on a kitchen scale. I then use my ninja skills to make a horizontal slice through the cheese with my katana, leaving the top half atop the bottom half. The scale now reads double what it did before, correct?


Wrong. The same amount of matter has the same amount of linea passing through it from top to bottom, so the weight does not change.

Maybe this will help: imagine that there are invisible lines passing vertically, from top to bottom, through all of space. These lines accelerate matter in one direction, 'down'. The more invisible lines passing through any 3D mass, the more 'weight'. That is all there is to it at the most basic level.

More complex, the density of the matter is also a factor, but the simple explanation is really enough to get the idea. Invisible, etherial lines of force, propelling everything down, like cosmic rays coming from one direction only, passing ghostlike through everything. The more matter they pass through the greater the effect.

This isn't that hard. It is terribly self-consistent. I don't know how to explain this any simpler. I've provided illustrations, numerous articles, I don't see how you are failing to grasp this concept.

What happens when I shred the cheese?


As long as the shreds are still together, as say, in a bowl, the weight remains the same, because the same amount of matter has the same number of linea passing through it.

However, because the shreds of cheese are not bonded together anymore, you can spread them apart (just like on earth!), and the individual little shreds are much more affected by air (just like on earth!) than the single big block (Just like on earth!), and you can scatter them in numerous ways, including blowing hard at them (Just like on earth!)

The individual shreds, however, are smaller pieces, and as such have a smaller cross-section horizontally, and they are not attached to a larger mass anymore, so they are lighter, they weigh less. Tossed into the air, they fall very slowly indeed. On earth, tiny cheese shreds fall more slowly than a block of cheese ONLY because of the air resistance. In Tryslmaistan this is also true, but is magnified further by the issue of fewer cosmic linea passing through a smaller cross-section, the result would look like exaggerated air resistance if you were to see it.

Suppose I have a ream of a thousand sheets of paper. This poses no real hazard as long as I keep it vertical, but if I happen to knock it over it starts crashing its way through the worldplate?


No, it does not crash through the worldplate. The effect is not that dramatic, and paper is a low-density tratonic matter. A thosand sheets of paper stacked vertically would weight less than a long ream of paper laid out flat, this is true. But the thickness of paper is very, very thin, so the cosmic linea pass through only a thin slice, despite more linea passing through the whole.

Maybe it would help to think of things as if matter were solar cells 'catching' sunlight. If the cells are angled towards the sun they are more efficient, if angled away from the sun, the efficiency begins to drop. In Tryslmaistan, matter is the solar cells, and the 'sun' is always perfectly straight overhead, and instead of making electricity, these 'solar cells' make a gravity like push.

The wider a structure is, the more 'solar rays' Tryslmaistan matter catches, and the greater the 'gravity' or weight. The taller a structure is, the fewer 'rays' are caught, and so the less the 'weight'. It is like 'gravity' (linovection) is 'beating down' like sunlight on matter in Tryslmaistan. Does this analogy help at all?

Of course, it is more complex than just this; the 'sunlight' also passes through matter, not just being absorbed at the topmost surface, and the type of traton, the type of matter is an issue too, some elements are 'heavier' than others because of their geometry. It is a lesser, a weaker effect, but it adds in. There is also an issue with scale itself, the effects of linovection drop off gradually so that at the level of a grain of sand, downward force is almost absent, 'microgravity'. But these are nitpicks.

Maybe the 'sunlight' metaphor will help. I am perhaps at a loss beyond this; I have drawn what pictures I can, I have explained as best I can, it is really fairly simple. Perhaps you are expecting linovection to be more bizarre than it actually is.

If you lived in Tryslmaistan, everything would seem just like living on earth initially, regarding weight and such, but you would notice, eventually, that dust never falls and floats in free-fall, sand falls very slowly from your hand, and rain falls very slowly too. You would barely notice that a big, wide dish in your hand feels lighter on edge than flat, you would notice that you feel a bit heavier lying down than standing up. Not enough to make you uncomfortable, but enough to notice. It would seem odd.

You would discover that you could stack things very high without having them collapse under their weight, at first you might wonder if those things were somehow stronger than they looked, but no, they are not. You would notice that a large thing, like a barn door, was significantly heavier flat than on edge, and this would be dramatic enough to really make you go 'huh?'.

But otherwise, you would not see any astonishingly weird effects. You might wonder why a balloon never felt truly light, and would fall as though it were a block of wood, while a metal pole, very thin, held perfectly upright, would fall more slowly than the balloon. But in most circumstances, you would not notice much of a difference at all.

Except perhaps with the salt shaker; salt or pepper, or any powder would, depending on the size of the grain, float incredibly slowly to your food, or, if it were dust-like enough, not fall at all. In Tryslmaistan, spices are made so that the grains are fairly large, or else they are made as sticky pastes, out of convenience, for this very reason. Nobody likes zero-gravity dust.

This is also why you have to occasionally wash your ceilings and walls of small particulates (as shown in Unicorn Jelly).
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby NMcCoy » Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:25 am

Sorry, I'm honestly not trying to be difficult here. Can I just do this, to try to get a sense of scale of how the effect works? A simple Alchemy 1 lab project, if you will. I can easily imagine this assignment being given in an actual introductory class, to teach children the basic properties of linovection.

(Note: I'm doing this in 2d, X and Z, for simplicity; assume that the Y depth is 1 for all figures, and all blocks are the same density.)

Assignment
You have been given the following wooden blocks.
[ ] 1x1x1, black
[ ][ ] 2x1x1, red
[ ][ ] 2x1x1, green
[ ][ ]
[ ][ ] 2x1x2, blue

Weigh the blocks in the configurations shown below. Record the result to one decimal place of accuracy in the provided space. The first one has been filled in as an example.

[ ] ___1.0___

[ ][ ] __________

[ ]
[ ] __________

[ ][ ]
[ ][ ] __________

[ ][ ]
[ ][ ] __________

[ ][ ]
[ ][ ] __________

[ ][ ]
[ ][ ] __________

[ ][ ][ ][ ] __________

[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ] __________

[ ]
[ ]
[ ] ________

[ ]
[ ]
[ ] ________

[ ]
[ ]
[ ][ ] __________

[ ]
[ ][ ][ ] __________

_____________________________________

I believe this will answer all the questions I have about linovection, and I'll pester you no longer unless the answers are truly baffling to me, in which case I'll just have one or two simple followup questions.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby Skatche » Tue Jan 27, 2009 8:18 am

Jennifer Diane Reitz wrote:If you tie two half-bricks with a piece of string, nothing particularly changes. Each half brick falls as a half brick normally would, and the string connecting them matters not at all. The issue is not whether anything is connected to anything else per se, the issue is how many vertical lines, linea, pass through the cross-section of a lump of matter.

...

What happens when I shred the cheese?


As long as the shreds are still together, as say, in a bowl, the weight remains the same, because the same amount of matter has the same number of linea passing through it.

However, because the shreds of cheese are not bonded together anymore, you can spread them apart (just like on earth!), and the individual little shreds are much more affected by air (just like on earth!) than the single big block (Just like on earth!), and you can scatter them in numerous ways, including blowing hard at them (Just like on earth!)


This is the apparent contradiction right here, and I don't feel that you've ever addressed this satisfactorily. Two bricks with the same orientation fall at the same rate, v. Tying the two bricks together (horizontally) does not turn them into a single object; they still fall at rate v. But if you cement them together, they would (presumably) become a single object with double the vertical cross-section, and fall at rate 2v. Given that the cement layer would have a very small vertical cross-section, we're all wondering how it so dramatically changes the bricks' interaction with the linea, and what constitutes a strong enough bond for this effect to occur. If we connected the bricks using maple syrup instead of cement, would they fall at 1.2v or something? What about before the cement dries?

You've said (and correct me if I'm wrong), that "objects" with wider vertical cross-sections fall faster than those with smaller cross-sections. We get that part. We just want to know what an object is.
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Re: Fun With Linovection

Postby strange_person » Tue Jan 27, 2009 10:11 am

Are the linea infinitely long, or are they tapered, like muscle cells?
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